P.Mean: Resources using Stack Overflow (created 2010-06-30).

A bunch of Internet resources fell into my lap all at once. Some of them relate to a new technology (Stack Overflow/Stack Exchange) that allows people to pose questions like an Interenet email discussion group, but it is web-based and has some of the capabilities associated with blogs and wikis.

Here's an overview of Stack Overflow

Joel Spolsky, Jeff Atwood, Jarrod Dixon, et al. About - Stack Overflow. Excerpt: "Stack Overflow is a programming Q & A site that's free. Free to ask questions, free to answer questions, free to read, free to index, built with plain old HTML, no fake rot13 text on the home page, no scammy google-cloaking tactics, no salespeople, no JavaScript windows dropping down in front of the answer asking for $12.95 to go away. You can register if you want to collect karma and win valuable flair that will appear next to your name, but otherwise, it's just free. And fast. Very, very fast. We don't run Stack Overflow. You do. Stack Overflow is collaboratively built and maintained by your fellow programmers. Once the system learns to trust you, you'll be able to edit anything, much like Wikipedia. With your help, we can build good answers to every imaginable programming question together. No matter what programming language you use, or what operating system you call home -- better programming is our goal." [Accessed June 29, 2010]. Available at: http://stackoverflow.com/about.

and Stack Exchange

Robert Cartaino. Changes to Stack Exchange - Blog – Stack Overflow. Excerpt: "We tried making our software available as a hosted white label product called Stack Exchange. We thought that other people would create awesome sites on every imaginable topic. Some people did (yay!), but it wasn’t the flood of high quality sites we were hoping for. So we’re making a few changes. Briefly: 1. Stack Exchange will now be free. 2. We’re changing the way that new Stack Exchange sites are created to move to a more democratic, community process. 3. The content of these new, community-created Stack Exchange sites will be publicly owned under a Creative Commons license, instead of being owned by individuals or businesses." [Accessed June 30, 2010]. Available at: http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2010/04/changes-to-stack-exchange/.

You can tag responses in Stack Overflow, and an important tag for many statisticians is R software. See what questions have been posted recently about R by going to this website: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/r

A Stack Exchange for Data Analysis is being developed: http://area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/33/statistical-analysis

A blog unrelated to Stack Overflow/Exchange is

Rob J. Hyndman. Research tips. Excerpt: "This blog is essentially an online book I am writing on doing research in statistics. Topics covered include LaTeX, R, writing and preparing a thesis, writing a journal article, submitting an article to a refereed journal, how to convince editors to publish your work, and writing referee reports. I know there are other good resources out there that cover some of the same material, but there are none that take account of the big changes in research that have arisen due to e-print repositories, blogs, wikis and online interactions, and none that are intended to be comprehensive in covering all aspects of learning the craft of research in statistics." [Accessed June 30, 2010]. Available at: http://robjhyndman.com/researchtips/about/.

Here's another blog:

Jeromy Anglim. Blog: Psychology and Statistics. Excerpt: "I'm a Lecturer at The University of Melbourne bridging I/O psychology and statistics. My blog contains 100+ posts focused on data analysis in the social sciences. If you're new, check out the Site Map. If you love R, check out the 40+ posts on R. If you want to follow the blog, see the RSS and email subscription options. " [Accessed June 30, 2010]. Available at: http://jeromyanglim.blogspot.com/.

There is also a "blog aggregator" that combines the blog postings of 71 English language blogs about R software. 71 blogs?!? Good grief.

Tal Galili. R bloggers. Excerpt: "R-Bloggers.com is a central hub (e.g: A blog aggregator) of content collected from bloggers who write about R (in English). The site will help R bloggers and users to connect and follow the “R blogosphere”. How does R-Bloggers operate? This site will aggregate feeds (only with permission!) from participating R blogs. The beginnings of each participating blog’s posts will automatically be displayed on the main page with links to the original posts; inside every post there is a link to the original blog and links to other related articles. All participating blogs will have links in the “Contributors” section of our sidebar" [Accessed June 30, 2010]. Available at: http://www.r-bloggers.com/about/.

To complete the circle, Tal Galili is promoting the Stack Exchange for Data Analysis on his own blog.

Tal Galili. A new Q&A website for Data-Analysis (based on StackOverFlow engine) – is waiting for you | R-statistics blog. Excerpt: "The bottom line of this post is for you to go to: Stack Exchange Q&A site proposal: Statistical Analysis And commit yourself to using the website for asking and answering questions. 144 peoples already committed to using the website, we need 356 more…" [Accessed June 30, 2010]. Available at: http://www.r-statistics.com/2010/06/a-new-qa-website-for-data-analysis-based-on-stackoverflow-engine-is-waiting-for-you/.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. This page was written by Steve Simon and was last modified on 2010-06-29. Need more information? I have a page with general help resources. You can also browse for pages similar to this one at Category: Teaching resources.