P.Mean >> Category >> Interesting books (created 2007-06-05).

These links present books that I have found useful and general information about writing books. General weblog entries are listed first, followed by descriptions of specific books, listed in alphabetical order.

2008

[[There is no material yet from my new site.]]

Creative Commons License All of the material above this paragraph is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. This page was written by Steve Simon and was last modified on 2010-04-11. The material below this paragraph links to my old website, StATS. Although I wrote all of the material listed below, my ex-employer, Children's Mercy Hospital, has claimed copyright ownership of this material. The brief excerpts shown here are included under the fair use provisions of U.S. Copyright laws.

Stats: What makes a good book? A sense of humor. (February 13, 2006). I was recently asked to evaluate a book proposal, and although I have not finished it, it made me think about what makes a book good. There are several things that I look for in a book about Statistics, and one of those things (not necessarily the most important) is a good sense of humor.

Stats: My ten favorite books, #8 (March 24, 2006). A recent query on the Medstats email discussion group reminded me that I need to continue the list of my ten favorite statistics books. Another book I really love and recommend all the time is: How To Report Statistics in Medicine. Thomas A. Lang, Michelle Secic (2006) Philadelphia, PA: American College of Physicians.

Stats: My ten favorite books, #9 (March 24, 2006). There is a lot of interest in applying Quality Control methods to health care problems. Whenever someone asks me about this topic, I recommend an excellent book: Understanding Variation: The Key to Managing Chaos. Donald J. Wheeler (1993) Knoxville, TN: SPC Press Inc.

Stats: My ten favorite books, #10 (March 17, 2006). A recently purchased book is worth mentioning, and it will probably make my Top Ten list. It has a very good section on how to properly apply diagnostic tests in the real world: Essential evidence-based medicine. Dan Meyer (2004) Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Alphabetical index of books

1 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

I've tried to provide general categories for the complexity of the books listed below. The choices are

  1. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.
  2. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics.
  3. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.
  4. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.

Top ten books [incomplete]

Books with little or no mathematical formulas [incomplete]

Books with an introduction to basic Statistics [incomplete]

Books that offer a gentle introduction to a specialized topic [incomplete]

Books with more mathematical details [incomplete]


1

  1. 100 Statistical Tests. Gopal K. Kanji (1993) London: SAGE Publications. This book is cited in Category: UnusualData. Description: Gopal Kanji lists specific details of many statistical tests, some quite obscure. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.

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  2. Advanced Topics in Statistical Process Control: The Power of Shewhart's Charts. Donald J. Wheeler (1995) Knoxville, Tennessee: SPC Press. [BookFinder4U link] This book is cited in Category: ControlCharts. Description: Wheeler's book provides theoretical and empirical justification for the use of control charts. A lot of good material if you need to justify why you are using a certain approach for control charts. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  3. The Analysis of Binary Data. David R. Cox, E. J. Snell (1977) London: Chapman and Hall, Ltd. This book is cited in Category: LogisticRegression. Description: Cox and Snell's book is a nice introduction to two by two tables with some advanced topics like overdispersion. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  4. Analysis of Longitudinal Data. Peter J. Diggle (1994) Oxford: Clarendon Press. This book is cited in Category: MixedModels. Description: Diggle, Liang, and Zeger's book provides an excellent overview of methods for longitudinal models which are the source of some of the greatest complexity in Statistics today. These authors, who have pioneered some of the most important work in this area, lay out both theoretical and practical information about analysis of longitudinal data. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  5. Applications, Basics, and Computing of Exploratory Data Analysis. Paul F. Velleman, David C. Hoaglin (1981) Boston: Duxbury Press. This book is cited in Category: DescriptiveStatistics. Description: Velleman and Hoaglin's book is the classic reference on exploratory data analysis. The authors describe some methods that were cutting-edge back in 1981, but which have now been incorporated into the mainstream of statistics. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics. A recent publishing initiative has placed the full text of this book on the web at hdl.handle.net/1813/78.
  6. Applied Logistic Regression. David W. Hosmer, Stanley Lemeshow (1989) New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. [BookFinder4U link] This book is cited in Category: LogisticRegression. Description: Hosmer and Lemeshow's book is the resource that everyone turns to when they need information about logistic regression. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  7. Applied Regression Analysis Third Edition. Norman R. Draper, Harry Smith (1998) New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. This book is cited in Category: LinearRegression. Description: Draper and Smith's book is the most comprehensive guide to regression that I know of. If you can't find it in Draper and Smith, it isn't important. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  8. Approximation Theorems of Mathematical Statistics. Robert J. Serfling (1980) New York: John Wiley & Sons. This book is cited in Category: StatisticalTheory. Description: Serfling's book provides all the mathematical theory needed to establish that something is asymptoticly normal. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.

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  9. Biostatistics The Bare Essentials. Geoffrey R. Norman, PhD, David L. Streiner, PhD (1994) St. Louis, Missouri: Mosby-Year Book, Inc. [BookFinder4U link] This book is cited in Category: TeachingResources. Description: Norman and Streiner's book is very readable book with a lot of humor. There is a second edition, published in 2000, that I have not seen. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics.
  10. Building Continual Improvement: A Guide for Business. Donald J. Wheeler, Shelia R. Poling (1998) Knoxville, Tennessee: SPC Press. [BookFinder4U link] This book is cited in Category: ControlCharts. Description: Wheeler and Poling's book provides a simple but rigorous introduction and overview of the use of control charts. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.

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  11. The Cambridge Dictionary of Statistics in the Medical Sciences. Everitt BS (1995) Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 0-521-47928-2. Description: A useful reference for all those technical terms you see in medical journals. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.
  12. Chaos, Fractals, and Noise Stochastic Aspects of Dynamics. Andrzej Lasota and Michael C. Mackey (1994) New York: Springer-Verlag. Description: Coming soon!
  13. Chaos. Making a New Science. Gleick J. New York NY: Penguin Books (1987). ISBN: 0-14-009250-1. Description: James Gleick tells the history of the development of Chaos Theory. An excellent book for someone who wants a non-technical introduction to the field. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.
  14. Crash Course in Spss for Windows: Updated for Versions 10, 11, 12 And 13. Andrew M. Colman, Briony Pulford. ISBN: 1405145315 Publisher: Blackwell Publishers - 2006-04-05. [BookFinder4U link] Description: People always ask me for book recommendations, and I am frequently at a loss for what to say. Recommending a book is actually quite difficult, though, because people's needs vary so much. A common request is for a book about SPSS, and the book mentioned above looks pretty good, though I have not read it yet. Category: SPSS software

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  15. Data Analysis & Statistics for Nursing Research. Denise F. Polit (1996) Stamford, Connecticut: Appleton & Lange. ISBN: 0-8385-6329-5. Description: Denise Polit introduces Statistics with a gentle touch and not so many formulas. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics.
  16. Dynamical System and Fractals: Computer graphics experiments in Pascal. Karl-Heinz Becker and Michael Dorfler (1990) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Description: Coming soon!

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  17. Elements of Graph Design. Kosslyn SM (1994) New York: W.H. Freeman and Company. Description: A nice guide to the perceptual issues associated with designing a good graph. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.
  18. Epidemiological Research Methods. McNeil D. New York NY: John Wiley and Sons (1996). ISBN: 0-471-96196-5. Description: Don McNeil provides a nice overview of the quantitative methods commonly used in Epidemiology. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.
  19. Epidemiology Kept Simple. An Introduction to Classic and Modern Epidemiology. Gerstman BB. New York NY: John Wiley and Sons (1998). ISBN: 0-471-24029-X. Description: Burt Gerstman has written a nice non-technical introduction to epidemiology. This book has an excellent discussion of how epidemiologists decide when you have enough evidence to assume a cause and effect relationship. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.
  20. Exploring the Geometry of Nature. Computer Modeling of Chaos, Fractals Cellular Automata and Neural Networks. Edward Rietman (1989) Blue Ridge Summit, PA: Windcrest Books. Description: Coming soon!

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  21. Fractal Concepts in Surface Growth. A.-L. Barabasi and H.E. Stanley (1995) Great Britain: Cambridge University Press. Description: Coming soon!
  22. Fractal Geometries Theory and Applications. Alain Mehaute (1991) Boca Raton, California: CRC Press Inc. Description: Coming soon!
  23. The Fractal Geometry of Nature. Benoit B. Mandelbrot (1977) New York: W.H. Freeman and Company. Description: Coming soon!
  24. Fractal Market Analysis: Applying CHAOS Theory to Investment & Economics. Edgar E. Peters (1994) Canada: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Description: Coming soon!
  25. Fractal Music, Hypercards and more.... Martin Gardner (1992) New York: W. H. Freeman and Company.  Description: This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic. 
  26. Fractal Programming in C. Roger T. Stevens (1989) Redwood City, California: M&T Publishing, Inc. Description: Coming soon!
  27. Fractals. A User's Guide for the Natural Sciences. Harold M. Hastings and George Sugihara (1993) New York: Oxford Science Publications. Description: Coming soon!
  28. Fractals and Chaos Simplified for the Life Sciences. Larry S. Liebovitch (1988) New York: Oxford University Press. Description: Coming soon!
  29. Fractals, Chaos, Power Laws: Minutes from an Infinite Paradise. Manfred Schroeder (1991) New York: W.H. Freeman and Company. Description: Coming soon!
  30. Fractals Everywhere. Michael F. Barnsley (1993) Cambridge: Academic Press Professional. Description: Coming soon!
  31. Fractals in Science. Armin Bunde and Shlomo Havlin (1994) Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag. Description: Coming soon!
  32. Fundamentals of Biostatistics. Bernard Rosner (1990) Belmont, California: Duxbury Press. ISBN: 0-534-91973-1. Description: Bernard Rosner provides a good solid introduction to Statistics with nice examples of sample size calculations. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics.

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  33. Generalized Additive Models (1990) Hastie TJ and Tibshirani R. London England: Chapman and Hall. ISBN: 0-412-34390-8. Description: Trevor Hastie and Robert Tibshirani give you a solid mathematical foundation for splines. They also discuss smoothing using splines and other approaches. Finally, they apply these smoothing estimates to the generalized linear model. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  34. Generalized Linear Models. McCullagh P, Nelder JA. (1983). London, England, Chapman and Hall, Inc. ISBN: 0-412-23850-0. This book is cited in Category: Logistic regression, Category: Poisson regression. Description: Peter McCullagh and James Nelder wrote the classic reference for the generalized linear model. The generalized linear model is indeed very general, as it includes linear regression, logistic regression, and Poisson regression models as special cases. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.

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  35. A Haircut in Horse Town: And Other Great Car Talk Puzzlers. Magliozzi T, Magliozzi R and Berman D (1999) New York NY: Berkley Publishing Group. Description: This book has a few clever math and logic puzzles which actually relate to some of the topics on these web pages.
  36. How to Report Statistics in Medicine. Lang TA and Secic M (1997) Philadelphia, PA: American College of Physicians. ISBN: 0-943126-44-4. Description: A comprehensive list of all the details that you need to mention when you write a research paper. There is a second edition which I have only briefly reviewed. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.
  37. How We Know What Isn't So. The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life. Gilovich T. New York NY: Simon & Schuster (1991). ISBN: 0-02-911706-2. Description: Thomas Gilovich explains why we tend to believe in things that have no scientific basis. Gilovich explains how our cognitive perceptions cause us to see patterns in random data and how we are so ready to believe what we want to believe. He discusses specific beliefs, such as alternative medicines and ESP, which arise from biases in our perceptions and in our expectations. He ends with a nice chapter on how to develop critical thinking skills. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.

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  38. Innovative Control Charting: Practical SPC Solutions for Today's Manfacturing Environment. Stephen A. Wise and Douglas C. Fair (1998) Milwaukee, Wisconsin: ASQ Quality Press. ISBN: 0-87389-385-9. This book is cited in Category: Control charts. Description: Stephen Wise and Douglas Fair show you how to adapt control charts to a wide range of difficult and problematic areas. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  39. Introduction to the Theory of Nonparametric Statistics. Randles RH, Wolfe DA. New York, John Wiley & Sons (1979). ISBN: 0-471-04245-5. Description: Ron Randles and Doug Wolfe show you all the mathematical foundations of nonparametric tests. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  40. An Introductory Guide to SPSS for Windows. EL Einspruch (1998) Thousand Oaks CA: Sage Publications. ISBN: 0-7619-0001-2. Description: An excellent beginners book for the SPSS system.

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  41. The Jackknife, the Bootstrap and Other Resampling Plans. Efron B. Philadelphia PA: Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (1982). ISBN: 0-89871-179-7. Description: Bradley Efron gives you all the details you need to use the bootstrap, an important and versatile tool for estimating bias and variability. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.

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  42. Logistic Regression: A Self-Learning Text. David G. Kleinbaum (1994) New York: Springer-Verlag. ISBN: 0-387-94142-8. This book is cited in Category: Logistic regression. Description: David Kleinbaum gives a slow and methodical introduction to the basic building blocks of logistic regression. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.

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  43. Medical Uses of Statistics Second Edition. John C. Bailar III and Frederick Mosteller (1992) Boston, Massachusetts: NEJM Books. Description: A wonderful introduction to the Statistics written entirely from a medical perspective.
  44. Measure, Topology, and Fractal Geometry. Gerald A. Edgar (1990) New York: Springer-Verlag. Description: Coming soon!
  45. Modeling Frequency and Count Data. Lindsey JK. London England: Oxford University Press (1995). ISBN: 0-19-852331-9. This book is cited in Category: Logistic regression, Category: Poisson regression. Description: This books presumes that you are already familar with the Generalized Linear Model, and proceeds to show you how to apply these models for a fascinating range of data sets. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  46. Multiple Comparisons. Theory and Methods. Hsu JC. London England, Chapman & Hall (1996). ISBN: 0-412-98281-1. Description: Jason Hsu has provided a comprehensive guide to the complex statistical issues involved when you are comparing more than two treatments to one another. This is an area full of controversies and misconceptions. This book contains some very recent developments in the area, including multiple comparisons with the best treatment. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.

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  47. Nonparametric Statistical Methods. Myles Hollander and Douglas A. Wolfe (1999) New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Description: This is a comprehensive and easy to follow guide to nonparametric statistics. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.

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  49. Practical Statistics for Medical Research. Douglas G. Altman (1991) London: Chapman & Hall. Description: A good general overview of statistics with a lot of emphasis on practical applications. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics.
  50. Proposals That Work: A Guide for Planning Dissertations and Grant Proposals (Third Edition). Lawrence F. Locke, Waneen Wyrick Spirduso, Stephen J. Silverman (1993) Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. This book is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: Coming soon!

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  51. Resampling Methods: A Practical Guide to Data Analysis. Good PI. Boston MA: Birkhauser (1999). ISBN: 0-8176-4091-6. Description: Phillip Good gives a simple introduction to permutation tests, the bootstrap, and other computer intensive approaches that avoid some of the problems of small sample sizes and non-normality. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.
  52. Research: Some Ground Rules. Lumley JSP and Benjamin W (1994) Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN: 0-19-854822-2. Description: This book provides practical advice on how to conduct a research study. This includes issues like handling of radioactive materials and the structure of a research report. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.
  53. Research Design Qualitative & Quantitative Approaches. Creswell JW (1994) London: Sage Publications. ISBN: 0-8039-5255-4. Description: This book explains the differences between quantitative and qualitative research and helps you decide which approach is best for your research study. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.

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  54. Sample Size Methodology. Desu MM, Raghavaro D. (1990) Boston MA: Academic Press (1990). ISBN: 0-12-212165-1. Description: This book provides all the formulas behind the power and sample size calculations. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  55. Sampling of Populations: Methods and Applications. Levy PS and Lemeshow S (1991). New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN: 0-471-50822-5. Description: Paul Levy and Stanley Lemeshow offer a thorough introduction to the various types of sampling with formulas for estimating precision. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  56. Signal Processing with Fractals A Wavelet-Based Approach. Gregory W. Wornell (1996) Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Description: Coming soon!
  57. Simultaneous Statistical Inference, Second Edition. Miller RG. New York, Springer-Verlag (1981). ISBN: 0-387-90548-0. Description: Rupert Miller provides formulas and tables for a variety of multiple comparisons adjustment. The first chapter discusses some of the philosophical issues. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  58. SPC for the Rest of Us: A Personal Path to Statistical Control. Hy Pitt (1994) Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc. ISBN: 0-201-56366-5. This book is cited in Category: Control charts. Description: Hy Pitt provides a good foundation in probability and statistics as the basis for using control charts. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.
  59. SPSS 12.0 Guide to Data Analysis. Marija Norusis. Description: I have not read this book, but it comes highly recommended in the Fall 2004 newsletter of the Teaching of Statistics in the Health Sciences Section of the American Statistical Association. The review was written by Daniel W. Byrne. Here's the opening paragraph of the review. Those who teach statistics in the health sciences are often asked to recommend “a good introductory statistics book”. This request is frequently made by physician/colleagues attempting to learn both data analysis and statistical software. Since it is unlikely that these busy professionals will have time and motivation to read both a statistics textbook and a statistical software manual, there is need for a book that combines the two. In my opinion, Marija Norusis’ book “SPSS® 12.0 Guide to Data Analysis” fills this niche better than any of the competing books. For the past 15 years, I have been recommending this book and have received positive feedback from my colleagues and students. Category: SPSS software
  60. Statistics, Third Edition Freedman D, Pisani R, and Purves R. New York NY: W.W. Norton and Company (1998). ISBN: 0-393-97083-3. Description: A very thorough introduction to basic statistical methods. This book has some fascinating examples of how Statistics affects the real world. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics.
  61. Statistics: A Bayesian Perspective. Berry DA. Belmont, CA, Duxbury. Description: I don't have this book yet, but it comes highly recommended. I'll add more details when this book arrives. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  62. Statistics as Principled Argument. Abelson, R. P. (1995) Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. ISBN: 0805805281. [BookFinder4U link]. Description: There is a wealth of wisdom in this book. The theme of this book is that Statistics provides basic principles to argue (debate might be a nicer word) about scientific claims. In the first chapter, Dr. Abelson argues that a persuasive argument has to have MAGIC--Magnitude, Articulation, Generality, Interestingness, and Credibility. Then he describes probability and randomness, illustrates common fallacies about probability, and shows how these principles can be applied to research findings. Chapter 5, On Suspecting Fishiness, describes some wonderful examples of strange numbers that might indicate fraud. This chapter is especially valuable because it is so rarely covered. The remaining chapters describe the MAGIC components of a persuasive argument with frequent citations of real research. This book is more conceptual than computational, which fits in with one of Abelson's Laws "Don't talk Greek if you don't know the English translation." Category: Critical appraisal
  63. Statistics: Concepts and Controversies Third Edition. Moore DS (1991) New York: W.H. Freeman and Company. ISBN: 0-7167-2199-6. Description: A Liberal Arts introduction to Statistics which focuses on concepts and ideas and not on the mathematical aspects. An excellent book for someone who wants to be a more intelligent consumer of statistics as they are presented in the media. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics.
  64. Statistical Computing. Kennedy WJ, Gentle JE.. New York, NY: Marcel Dekker (1980). ISBN: 0-8247-6898-1. Description: William Kennedy and James Gentle show all the computational details behind the statistical software. If you want to program statistical methods from scratch, this is a good reference book to have. There are a lot of subtle issues involving efficiency and numerical stability that you should worry about whenever you want to "roll your own" statistical methods. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  65. Statistical Distributions, Second Edition. Evans M, Hastings N, Peacock B. New York NY: John Wiley and Sons (1993). ISBN: 0-471-55951-2. Description: If you need to understand the mathematical foundations of the normal or Poisson distribution, this is a good place to start. It provides information about the characteristic function and the moments. The authors provide nice graphs of the distribution for various parameters, as well as relationships among the distributions. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  66. Statistical Intervals. A Guide for Practitioners. Hahn GJ, Meeker WQ. New York NY: John Wiley and Sons (1991). ISBN: 0-471-88769-2. Description: Gerald Hahn and William Meeker discuss two important alternatives to the confidence interval: the tolerance interval and the prediction interval. These intervals are useful when you wish to characterize a specified fraction of your population (tolerance interval) or if you want to predict one or more future individual observations (prediction interval). The authors do an excellent job outlining when to use which type of interval and they provide formulas for a variety of cases. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  67. Statistical Methods for Health Sciences. Shoukri MM, Edge VL. (1996). Boca Raton FL: CRC Press, Inc. ISBN: 0-8493-7644-0. Description: Mohamed Shoukri and Victoria Edge give you some very nice material on measures of agreement that are difficult to find elsewhere. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  68. Statistical Methods for Rates and Proportions. Second Edition. Fleiss JL. New York NY: John Wiley and Sons (1981). ISBN: 0-471-06428-9. This book is cited in Category: Logistic regression. Description: Joseph Fleiss likes to use a continuity correction in all his formulas, a controversial practice that I happen to disagree with. But I still use this book a lot, especially for highly specialized topics that are hard to find elsewhere. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  69. Statistical Methods for the Analysis of Biomedical Data. Robert F. Woolson (1987) New York: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN: 0-471-80615-3. Description: Robert Woolson takes you from very basic statistics through regression, analysis of variance, and survival curves. This book is good for someone looking for an introduction to statistics.
  70. Structural Equations with Latent Variables. Bollen KA. New York NY: John Wiley and Sons (1989). ISBN: 0-471-01171-1. Description: Ken Bollen has written the classic introduction to Structural Equations Modelling, which is also known as path analysis, causal analysis, and LISREL models. SEM is a flexible method that allows you to account for measurement error and estimate latent (hidden) factors in your data. You should probably have a good working knowledge of simple linear regression models and factor analysis before you tackle something like SEM.  This book is for students who want more mathematical details.
  71. Studying a Study and Testing a Test: How to Read the Health Science Literature Third Edition. Riegelman RK and Hirsch RP (1996) Boston: Little, Brown and Company. ISBN: 0-316-74521-9. Description: A nice introduction to the critical review of medical research. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.
  72. The Survey Research Handbook Second Edition Guidelines and Strategies for Conducting a Survey. Pamela L. Alreck, Settle, Robert B. (1995) Chicago, IL: Irwin Professional Publishing. Description: A very practical reference on surveys with a lot of emphasis on planning. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.

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  73. Transformation and Weighting in Regression. Carroll RJ, Ruppert D. New York, NY: Chapman and Hall (1988). ISBN: 0-412-01421-1. Description: Raymond Carroll and David Ruppert address the difficult problem of what you should do when the variances in a regression model are not all the same. This book is for students who want more mathematical details.

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  74. Understanding Statistical Process Control. Donald J Wheeler, David S Chambers (1992) [BookFinder4U link] This book is cited in Category: ControlCharts. Description: Donald Wheeler and David Chambers provide all the details for someone who uses control charts on a regular basis. They offer lots of practical advice. This book is a gentle introduction to a specialized topic.
  75. Understanding Variation: The Key to Managing Chaos. Donald J. Wheeler (1993) Knoxville, TN: SPC Press Inc. ISBN: 0-945320-35-3. This book is cited in Category: Control charts. Description: An insightful introduction about variation in business processes, how to identify it and how to control it. A must read for anyone working on improving quality in work processes. This book has very few if any mathematical formulas.
  76. Using R for Introductory Statistics. John Verzani (2005). Boca Raton FL: Chapman & Hall/CRC. [BookFinder4U link] This book is cited in Category: R software . Description: This book provides a general introduction to statistics and incorporates examples in R throughout the text.

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  77. Writing Grant Proposals That Win. Phale D. Hale, Jr. (1997) Alexandria, Virginia: Capital Publications Inc. This book is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: Coming soon!

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Other people's libraries

Basic Library List (The Mathematical Association of America). Excerpt: The Basic Library List contains a list of books in the mathematical sciences recommended for college, high school, and public libraries. It is designed to provide students with introductory sources that might not be part of their curriculum; to provide reading material that is collateral to regular courses; to provide faculty with reference material that is relevant to their teaching; and to provide appropriate references for students in disciplines that use the mathematical sciences. This website was last verified on 2007-12-31. URL: www.maa.org/BLL/home.htm

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