P.Mean >> Category >> Grant writing (crated 2007-08-06).

These pages offer some practical advice I have found on how to write an effective grant. Articles are arranged by date with the most recent entries at the top. You can find outside resources at the bottom of this page. Closely related pages can be found at Category: Presenting research data or Category: Writing research papers.

2011

11. P.Mean: Proposal for session on grant writing (created 2011-10-04). I might be helping out with a workshop at an upcoming research conference on the statistical considerations for writing a CAM grant. Here's an outline of what this workshop might involve.

10. P.Mean: When you're stuck writing major sections of another person's grant (created 2011-06-02). I was helping someone write a grant when I got that request that I always dread, "Can you write this section of the grant." I hate those requests for a personal reason--I'd much rather tell someone else what to do than to actually do it myself. One of the great joys of consulting is being able to boss other people around. But there's a serious reason why I dislike this. I believe that a grant should be written by one person, with guidance of course by other experts. But one person needs to have at least a passing level of familiarity with each and every aspect of the grant; enough familiarity that they can write the entire grant. It also assures consistency of tone and language. But there are often reasons why this can't be done, and if you're stuck writing major sections of someone else's grant, you need to write your section of the grant so that it fits in well with the rest of the grant. There's a famous saying that a camel is a horse designed by a committee. You want to make sure that the completed protocol does not come out looking like a camel. If certain sections have abrupt transitions, use different terms for the same thing, and have radical changes in writing style, you've got problems. You won't get things perfect, and I certainly didn't with this project. But the closer you get, the better the grant will be.

9. P.Mean: New shortened structure for NIH grants (created 2011-06-02). I am working on an NIH grant looking at various Bayesian models for accrual. NIH changed the grant proposal format last year to a much shorter proposal. Good for them, I say. Here are some of the details that I'm reviewing prior to writing my grant proposal.

8. P.Mean: Writing the methods section of your grant (created 2001-01-15, revised 2011-04-26). Dear Professor Mean, I'm starting to write the methods section for a research grant, but I have no idea where to start. -- Dazed Dana

7. P.Mean: Resources for Comparative Effectiveness Research (created 2011-04-13). I attended an interesting webinar on Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER). I always try to take notes during presentations like this, but my notes are often a poor amagalm of random thoughts and realizations. What I did find, though, during this webinar, were links to two important resources for CER.

Outside resources:

Creative Commons License All of the material above this paragraph is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. This page was written by Steve Simon and was last modified on 2010-04-11. The material below this paragraph links to my old website, StATS. Although I wrote all of the material listed below, my ex-employer, Children's Mercy Hospital, has claimed copyright ownership of this material. The brief excerpts shown here are included under the fair use provisions of U.S. Copyright laws.

2006

6. Stats: Using a colloquial tone in a grant application (July 25, 2006). As I have mentioned many times in this weblog, I am writing a grant. One question raised was whether I was adopting too informal a tone for this grant.

2004

5. Stats: Nitty Gritty NIH (September 3, 2004). Bill Caskey talked about some of the nitty gritty details of the NIH Grant process. His talk focused mostly on what happens after a grant gets funded.

2001

4. Stats: Writing a methods section (January 15, 2001). Dear Professor Mean, I'm starting to write the methods section for a research grant, but I have no idea where to start. -- Dazed Dana

1999

3. Where do research ideas come from? by Ronan Conroy (September 20, 1999). This is an HTML format version of an email by Ronan Conroy on April 9, 1999 to edstat-l, an Internet list and to sci.stat.edu, a USENET group. This email summarized a presentation he made about how to develop ideas for research. I have made some minor formatting changes (mostly the use of bolding, bulleting, and indenting to highlight the major themes), but all of the credit for writing up this summary belongs to Ronan Conroy. Part of this presentation represents a summary of discussions on edstat-l and sci.stat.edu.\

2. Stats: Writing a research grant (September 13, 1999). Dear Professor Mean, I'm writing a research grant to look at the impact of managed care on the care of children with chronic epilepsy. How do I structure the grant so I'm guaranteed to get funding? -- Ambitious Ann

1. Stats: Developing a research hypothesis (August 18, 1999). Dear Professor Mean, I want to do some research, but before the hospital won't approve anything until I have a protocol with a research hypothesis. I'm not sure why a research hypothesis is important. Can you help? -- Little Linda

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Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. This page was written by Steve Simon and was last modified on 2010-04-11.