P.Mean >> Category >> Interesting websites (created 2007-06-06).

These pages present a wide range of websites that I have highlighted in my weblog. I have included a brief annotation for recent entries, and will try to add annotations to earlier entries when I have time. Specific websites are listed in alphabetical order. Compilations that include websites are listed by date with the most recent entries at the top.

2008

[[There is no material yet from my new site.]]

Creative Commons License All of the material above this paragraph is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. This page was written by Steve Simon and was last modified on 2010-04-11. The material below this paragraph links to my old website, StATS. Although I wrote all of the material listed below, my ex-employer, Children's Mercy Hospital, has claimed copyright ownership of this material. The brief excerpts shown here are included under the fair use provisions of U.S. Copyright laws.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L

M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X

Y | Z | 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9

Broken links

Compilations that include interesting websites

Websites that have not yet been properly formatted

A

  1. Advice on designing scientific posters (Colin Purrington). This website is cited in Category: Scientific presentations and publications. Description: Good practical advice, especially for beginners like me, on how to design and present a scientific poster. This website was last verified on 2007-07-23. . URL: www.swarthmore.edu/NatSci/cpurrin1/posteradvice.htm
  2. AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines REsearch Evaluation) Collaboration. AGREE Collaboration. This website is cited in Category: CriticalAppraisal. Excerpt: AGREE is an international collaboration of researchers and policy makers who seek to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practice guidelines by establishing a shared framework for their development, reporting and assessment. This website was last verified on 2008-URL: www.agreecollaboration.org
  3. All About Grants Tutorials (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page reviews how to plan and write the basic NIH grant, known at the R01. In addition to the basics of grant writing, this page discusses electronic submission of grants, and specialized grants, such as a multiproject grant application and an application for research involving animals. This website was last verified on 2007-09-04. Category: Grant writing. URL: www.niaid.nih.gov/ncn/grants/default.htm
  4. AP Statistics Module. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and Conducting a Study. (PDF). Chris Olsen, Roxy Peck, Peter Flanagan-Hyde, Dick Scheaffer, College Board. This website is cited in Category: TeachingResources. Description: This web page proivdes a lengthy (122 page) discussion of how to plan and conduct a research study. It is intended to help students studying for the Advanced Placement exam in Statistics, but the advice is of general value to anyone involved in research. This website was last verified on 2008-03-24. URL: apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/AP_Statistics_Module_Planning_and_Conducting_a_Study.pdf
  5. The Art of Grantsmanship (Jacob Kraicer). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page contains offers very practical advice, including the value of understanding the grant from a reviewer's perspective ("You want the reviewers to be your enthusiastic champions and advocates. A luke-warm review is fatal"). This website was last verified on 2007-09-04. URL: www.hfsp.org/how/ArtOfGrants.htm
  6. Articles on statistics, epidemiology and research design (The Medical Journal of Australia). This website is cited in Category: Teaching resources. Description: The Medical Journal of Australia publishes numerous articles on research methodology and all of the content is full free text. This particular page on their website has links to over 100 articles about statistics, epidemiology, and research design. This website was last verified on 2007-11-29. URL: www.mja.com.au/Topics/Statistics,%20epidemiology%20and%20research%20design.html
  7. Australasian Data and Story Library (OzDASL). Gordon Smyth. This website is cited in Category: Teaching resources. Description: OzDASL is a Library of data sets and associated stories. It is intended as a resource for teachers of statistics in Australia and New Zealand, and emphasis is given to data sets with an Australasian context. This website was last verified on 2000-12-26. URL: www.statsci.org/data/

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  8. Babelfish Translation. AltaVista. This website is cited in Category: InformationSearching. Description: This website will provide translations to/from Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish. The translations are not always perfect, but it is invaluable when you stumble across an interesting website in a language you don't understand. This website was last verified on 2008-2-15. URL: babelfish.altavista.com
  9. Basic Tools for Process Improvement: Cause-and-Effect Diagram [PDF]. US Navy Total Quality Leadership Office. This website is cited in Category: QualityControl. Description: This website offers simple explanations of the cause and effect diagram, a classic tool used in quality improvement. This same guide is also found at www.management-tools.org/files/c-ediag.pdf and www.saferpak.com/cause_effect_articles/howto_cause_effect.pdf. Other guides are available at www.hq.navy.mil/RBA/text/tools.html. This website was last verified on 2006-03-24. URL: www.hq.navy.mil/RBA/c-ediag.pdf
  10. Bayesian Unconditional Power Analysis (John S. Uebersax). The website was cited in Category: Sample size justification. This website is cited in . Description: When you perform a traditional power calculation, you need to specify the size of the difference that you want to detect. Sometimes this represents the minimum difference that is clinically relevant and sometimes it is a difference that is observed in a previous research study. If the latter is chosen, you need to account for sampling error in the previously observed difference. Otherwise the estimated power is biased, often biased downward. This website was last verified on 2007-07-24. URL: ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jsuebersax/bpower.htm.
  11. Bias Glossary. Medical University of South Carolina. This website is cited in Category: ObservationalStudies. Description: This website provides concise definitions of thirteen types of biases that are likely to affect research findings. This website was last verified on 2008-2-16. URL: www.musc.edu/dc/icrebm/bias.html
  12. Bioethics Issues. Alan Milstein, Sherman, Silverstein, Kohl, Rose & Podolsky, Attorneys at Law. This website is cited in Category: EthicsInResearch. Description: This webpage lists resources covering many controversial research experiments. This website was last verified on 2008-01-25. URL: www.sskrplaw.com/bioethics/index.html
  13. A Brief Guide to Questionnaire Development. Robert Frary, Virginia Tech. This website is cited in Category: Survey design. Excerpt: Most people have responded to so many questionnaires in their lives that they have little concern when it becomes necessary to construct one of their own. Unfortunately the results are often unsatisfactory. These problems are sufficiently prevalent that numerous books and journal articles have been written addressing them (e.g., see Dillman, 1978). Also, various educational and proprietary organizations regularly offer workshops in questionnaire development. Therefore, the brief exposition that follows is intended only to identify some of the more prevalent problems in questionnaire development and to suggest ways of avoiding them. This paper does not cover the development of inventories designed to measure psychological constructs, which would require a deeper discussion of psychometric theory than is feasible here. Instead, the focus will be on questionnaires designed to collect factual information and opinions. This website was last verified on 2008-01-14. URL: www.testscoring.vt.edu/questionaire_dev.html

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  14. Calling all charlatans. A group of researchers puts companies making scientific claims on the spot. (Andrea Gawrylewski). This website is cited in Category: Critical appraisal. Description: A short article discussing a group of scientists who examine scientific claims made in advertisements for various products. This website was last verified on 2007-10-12. URL: www.the-scientist.com/news/home/53699/
  15. Carlo Emilio Bonferroni. Michael Dewey. This website is cited in Category: MultipleComparisons. Description: This website provides information about the mathematician whose work led to the Bonferroni correction. This website was last verified on 2003-12-19. URL: www.aghmed.fsnet.co.uk/bonf/bonf.html
  16. Centre for Multilevel Modelling (Hilary Browne). This website is cited in Category: Mixed models. Description: This website describes the activities of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling, such as providing training materials and workshops, developing new methodology and collaborating with researchers in social science. This group alo produces MLwiN, a software package for fitting multilevel models. This website was last verified on 2007-09-20. URL: www.cmm.bristol.ac.uk
  17. Clinical Research Guide (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page reviews how to write a grant with a focus on human subjects research. This page is great for optimists because it also includes guidance on what to do after you get funded. This website was last verified on 2007-09-04. URL: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/crg/index.php
  18. Clinical Trials Reporting and Publication. CRS Report for Congress. . Eric D. Williams. This website is cited in Category: PublicationBias. Excerpt: The central issue before Congress with respect to clinical trials reporting and publication is how to balance the potential beneficial public health effects of requiring that clinical trials data be made public with the burdens that such requirements may place on companies and their innovation. Clinical trials, which are conducted regularly to test the effects of new pharmaceuticals and medical devices, cost a significant amount of money, and by their nature may present some risk to the people who participate in them. Manufacturers as well as medical journal editors have been reluctant to publish clinical trial data indicating that products in development are harmful or ineffective. The availability of such information might save a duplication of effort and studies that harm or fail to help patients. This website was last verified on 2008-02-16. URL: www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32832.pdf
  19. Common Mistakes in NIH Applications (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page reviews common problems that prevent a grant from getting a good evaluation. These problems are divided into issues involving the scientific significance, the specific aims, the experimental approach, the investigator, and the environment. This website was last verified on 2007-09-04.  URL: www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/grantwriting_mistakes.htm
  20. Confidence Intervals Involving Data to Which a Logarithmic Transformation Has Been Applied. Gerard E. Dallal, Tufts University. This website is cited in Category: ConfidenceIntervals. Description: This webpage explains how to interpret a confidence interval for a difference in means for data that is log-transformed. When this interval is back-transformed to the original scale of measurement, it becomes a confidence interval for the ratio of geometric means. This website was last verified on 2008-03-10. URL: www.tufts.edu/~gdallal/ci_logs.htm
  21. Correspondence Analysis. François-Xavier Micheloud. This website is cited in Category: UnusualData. Excerpt: This paper is an introduction to correspondence analysis, a statistical method allowing to analyze and describe graphically and synthetically big contingency tables, that is tables in which you find at the intersection of a row and a column the number of individuals who share the characteristic of the row and that of the column. Description: This website provides a good general overview of what correspondence analysis is and how to use it. This website was last verified on 2008-03-04. URL: www.micheloud.com/FXM/COR/E/index.htm Correspondence Analysis Excerpt: This paper is an introduction to correspondence analysis, a statistical method allowing to analyze and describe graphically and synthetically big contingency tables, that is tables in which you find at the intersection of a row and a column the number of individuals who share the characteristic of the row and that of the column. Description: This website provides a good general overview of what correspondence analysis is and how to use it.

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  22. The Data and Story Library (DASL). Matthew Hutcheson, Mike Meyer, Cara Olson, Paul Velleman, John Walker, Cornell University. This website is cited in Category: Teaching resources. Excerpt: DASL (pronounced "dazzle") is an online library of datafiles and stories that illustrate the use of basic statistics methods. We hope to provide data from a wide variety of topics so that statistics teachers can find real-world examples that will be interesting to their students. This website was last verified on 2008-01-14. URL: lib.stat.cmu.edu/DASL/
  23. Data Visualization: Modern Approaches (Vitaly Friedman and Sven Lennartz).  This website is cited in Category: Writing research papers. Description: This website offers some innovative ways of displaying data, especially unusual data sets. This website was last verified on 2007-08-07. URL: www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/08/02/data-visualization-modern-approaches/
  24. Distinguishing Association from Causation: A Backgrounder for Journalists (Kathleen Meister). This website is cited in Category: Critical appraisal. Description: This 24 page report, published on October 29, 2007, by the American Council on Science and Health, argues that randomized trials, if they can be conducted, provide strong evidence for a causal effect. In contrast, animal and in vitro experiments do not provide strong evidence for a causal relationship but rather are useful for establishing biological mechanisms. Observational studies can sometimes establish a causal relationship. The key things to look for are temporality of the relationship, strength of the relationship, a dose-response relationship, consistency across varied conditions, and biological plausibility. This website was last verified on 2007-11-16. URL: www.acsh.org/publications/pubID.1629/pub_detail.asp
  25. DM Review. Source Media. This website is cited in Category: DataMining. Excerpt: "DM Review delivers market-leading insight through interviews, articles and columns written by the best consultants, hands-on practitioners and technology solution leaders the industry has to offer. Editorial focus is on business intelligence, performance management, analytics, integration and enterprise data warehousing as well as emerging areas that include business process management and technology architectures. Our audience is almost evenly divided between business and IT executives. DM Review has been providing thought leadership for more than 18 years." This website was last verified on 2008-03-09. URL: www.dmreview.com/

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  26. Ed Rigdon's SEM FAQ. This website is cited in Category: Unusual data. Description: This is the first place you should look if you have questions about Structural Equation Models. This website was last verified on 2007-07-23. URL: www2.gsu.edu/~mkteer/semfaq.html
  27. Effective Foundation Grantseeking Strategies (Mark W. Jones). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page outlines how to find the foundation that will support your work, how to make the inital contact, how to apply for funding, and how to respond to a rejection. This website was last verified on 2007-09-04. URL: www.mindspring.com/~ajgrant/m_jones.htm.
  28. Email Address Munger/Email Address Encoder. Juan Rodriguez. This website is cited in Category: WebsiteDetails. Excerpt: Email address munging is the act of using ASCII, JavaScript, and scrambling of letters in your email address in order to hide your email address from spam bots, spiders, and spoofers. Our anti junk email tool protects your email address and helps prevent spam by avoiding spam bots and email address harvesters. This tool allows you to munge and mask your email address by using ASCII, JavaScript, and/or image links. This website was last verified on 2008-06-17. URL: www.addressmunger.com/
  29. Engagement of Institutions in Research (J. Thomas Puglisi). This website is cited in Category: Ethics in research. Description: In a memo dated January 26, 1999, the Director of the Division of Human Subject Protections explained that an institution becomes engaged in human subjects research (and needs a formal review of that research) when they "intervene or interact with living individuals for research purposes" or they "obtain individually identifiable private information for research purposes." What about a statistician who analyzes data collected at another site? Does this constitute a level of work that would require review at the statistician's site? You're off the hook if you "at no time obtain, receive, or possess identifiable private information." If you receive coded data that can be linked back to private information, you do need to seek approval, unless "a written agreement unequivocally prohibits release of identifying codes." This website was last verified on 2007-11-28. URL: www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/assurance/engage.htm
  30. EVIDENCE-BASED-HEALTH@JISCMAIL.AC.UK. JISCMail. This website is cited in Category: TeachingResources. Description: This website contains the archives of the Evidence Based Health discussion group. This website was last verified on 2008-03-03. URL: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/EVIDENCE-BASED-HEALTH.html

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  31. Fear and loathing of pharmaceutical statistics [PDF]. (Stephen Senn). This website is cited in Category: Conflict of interest. Description: Stephen Senn has often argued that the quality of industry sponsored research is higher than academic research. In this talk, he discusses some of the recent claims that commercially sponsored research is biased. This website was last verified on 2007-12-05. URL: www.wtcrf.ed.ac.uk/education/talks%20-%20new/20050602StephenSenn.pdf

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  32. GRADE working group. Morio Aihara, Pablo Alonso, David Atkins, Malgorzata Bala, Dana Best, Patrick Bossuyt, Jan Brozek, Francoise Cluzeau, Jonathan C Craig, Tony Dans, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Martin Eccles, Yngve Falck-Ytter, Cindy Farquhar, Signe Flottorp, Paul Glasziou, Gordon H. Guyatt, Robin T. Harbour, Mark Helfand, David Henry, Suzanne Hill, Andrea Horvath, Roman Jaeschke, Katharine Jones, Tsutani Kiichiro, Regina Kunz, Joseph Lau, Gillian Leng, Wiktoria Lesniak, Anne Lethaby, Alessandro Liberati, Nicola Magrini, Susan Manley, Mercè Marzo, James Mason, Alison MacLeod, Philippa Middleton, Andrew Mitchell, Victor M. Montori, Susan L. Norris, Günter Ollenschläger, Wytze Oosterhuis, Jacek Mrukowicz, Andrew David Oxman, Bob Phillips, David M Rind, Vivian Robinson, Arturo Salazar, Holger J Schünemann, Haruko Shimamura, Tessa Tan-Torres Edejer, Mario Tristan, Peter Tugwell, Mariska Tuut, Anja Tuulonen, Helena Varonen, Gunn E. Vist, John W. Williams, Stephanie Zaza. This website is cited in Category: SystematicOverviews. Excerpt: The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (short GRADE) Working Group began in the year 2000 as an informal collaboration of people with an interest in addressing the shortcomings of present grading systems in health care. The working group has developed a common, sensible and transparent approach to grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Many international organizations have provided input into the development of the approach and have started using it. This website was last verified on 2008-04-28. URL: www.gradeworkinggroup.org
  33. Grant Proposal Writing Tips (Corporation for Public Broadcasting). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page contains a nice list of preparation steps (define your project, identify the right funding sources, contact the funders, acquire proposal guidelines, know the submission deadline, determine personnel needs, and update your timeline). It also lists the elements of the narrative (statement of need, approach, method of evaluation, project timeline, and credentials), and the need to develop a hook (a description of the idea that makes a proposal compelling to the reviewers). This website was last verified on 2007-09-04. URL: www.cpb.org/grants/grantwriting.html.
  34. Grants & Funding Opportunities (U.S. National Institutes of Health). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: In Fiscal Year 2003, NIH has a budget of $27.2 billion. Much of this money goes to extramural grants. This website was last verified on 2007-12-31. URL:  grants1.nih.gov/grants/
  35. Guidance on Research Involving Coded Private Information or Biological Specimens (Office for Human Research Protections). This website is cited in Category: Privacy in research. Excerpt: This document applies to research involving coded private information or human biological specimens (hereafter referred to as "specimens") that is conducted or supported by HHS. This document does the following: (1) Provides guidance as to when research involving coded private information or specimens is or is not research involving human subjects, as defined under HHS regulations for the protection of human research subjects (45 CFR part 46). (2) Reaffirms OHRP policy (see OHRP guidance on repository activities and research on human embryonic stem cells) that, under certain limited conditions, research involving only coded private information or specimens is not human subjects research. (3) Clarifies the distinction between (a) research involving coded private information or specimens that does not involve human subjects and (b) human subjects research that is exempt from the requirements of the HHS regulations. (4) References pertinent requirements of the HIPAA Privacy Rule that may be applicable to research involving coded private information or specimens. This website was last verified on 2007-06-06. URL: www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/guidance/cdebiol.htm
  36. A Guide for Proposal Writing (National Science Foundation). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page reviews the two NSF criteria for evaluation (intellectual merit and broader impacts) and emphasizes the need to plan before you write (gather background information, look at the program solicitation, think about the target audience, and build a coalition). you should also understand the review process. The advice about proposal writing stresses the need for organization, readability, and understandability. . This website was last verified on 2007-09-04. URL: www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf04016&org=NSF.

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  37. The Hawthorne effect: a note. Steve Draper, Department of Psychology, University of Glasgow. This website is cited in Category: Placebo controlled trials. This website was last verified on 2008-01-14. URL: www.psy.gla.ac.uk/~steve/hawth.html
  38. The History of Human Medical Experimentation in the United States. Mike Adams. This website is cited in Category: EthicsInResearch. Description: This webpage provides a detailed and harshly critical timeline of medical research. The author has an axe to grind against traditional medicine and big drug companies, but the descriptions are still valuable. This website was last verified on 2008-03-09. URL: www.naturalhealthreport.com/USHME01.html 
  39. How do we assess the quality of information?. Prostate Cancer Charter for Action. This website is cited in Category: InformationSearching. Description: This website provides a checklist of questions that you can use to assess the quality of web pages that provide health information. This website was last verified on 2008-04-23. URL: www.prostate-link.org.uk/index.asp?o=1024 How do we assess the quality of information? Description: This website provides a checklist of questions that you can use to assess the quality of web pages that provide health information.

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  40. Information Is Not Entropy, Information Is Not Uncertainty!. Thomas D. Schneider, National Cancer Institute. This website is cited in Category: Information theory. Excerpt: There are many many statements in the literature which say that information is the same as entropy. The reason for this was told by Tribus. The story goes that Shannon didn't know what to call his measure so he asked von Neumann, who said `You should call it entropy ... [since] ... no one knows what entropy really is, so in a debate you will always have the advantage' (Tribus1971). This website was last verified on 2008-01-14. URL: www.lecb.ncifcrf.gov/~toms/information.is.not.uncertainty.html
  41. Instrumental variable. Wikipedia. This website is cited in Category: UnusualData. Excerpt: In statistics and econometrics, an instrumental variable (IV, or instrument) can be used to produce a consistent estimator of a parameter when the explanatory variables (covariates) are correlated with the error terms. Such correlation can be caused by endogeneity, by omitted covariates, or by measurement errors in the covariates. In this situation, ordinary linear regression produces biased and inconsistent estimates. However, if an instrument is available, consistent estimates may still be obtained. An instrument is a variable that does not itself belong in the explanatory equation, that is correlated with the suspect explanatory variable, and that is uncorrelated with the error term. This website was last verified on 2008-04-14. URL: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instrumental_variable
  42. Instrumental Variable Estimation. David A. Kenny. This website is cited in Category: UnusualData. Excerpt: One way of identifying models that cannot be estimated by using multiple regression is through the use of instrumental variables. For path analysis, the disturbance must not be correlated with each causal variable. There are three reasons why such a correlation might exist: * Spuriousness (Third Variable Causation): A variable causes both the endogenous variable and one its causal variables and that variable is not included in the model. * Reverse Causation (Feedback Model): The endogenous variable causes, either directly or indirectly, one of its causes. * Measurement Error: There is measurement error in a causal variable. This website was last verified on 2008-04-14. URL: davidakenny.net/cm/iv.htm

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  43. Journal Info (National Library of Sweden). This website is cited in Category: Writing research papers. Description: If you are looking for a journal in a specific area, perhaps to publish in, then this site is for you. It lists over 18,000 journals divided into broad classes such as History, Law, and Medicine. The Medicine category is further divided into areas like Dentistry, Hematology, and Oncology. This website was last verified on 2007-07-09. URL: jinfo.lub.lu.se/
  44. Journal of Statistics Education (JSE) Data Archive. American Statistical Association. This website is cited in Category: Teaching resources. Description: Data sets used in the various articles in the Journal of Statistics Education. This website was last verified on 2008-01-14. URL: www.amstat.org/publications/jse/jse_data_archive.html

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  45. Martin Bland's Home Page. Martin Bland, University of York. This website is cited in Category: TeachingResources. Description: This website includes teaching notes, publications, and other material from Martin Bland. The breadth of coverage is outstanding. This site can also be accessed from http://martinbland.co.uk. This website was last verified on 2008-01-28. URL: www-users.york.ac.uk/~mb55/

  46. MedStats. Google Groups. This website is cited in Category: TeachingResources. Description: This website hosts an Internet discussion group about medical statistics. This website was last verified on 2008-01-26. URL: www.groups.google.com/group/MedStats
  47. Multiple significance tests and the Bonferroni correction. Martin Bland. This website is cited in Category: MultipleComparisons. Description: This website provides a simple introduction to the Bonferroni correction. It is an excerpt from An Introduction to Medical Statistics, Third Edition. This website was last verified on 2008-04-10. URL: www-users.york.ac.uk/~mb55/intro/bonf.htm
  48. Multiple Comparisons with Repeated Measures. David C. Howell, University of Vermont. This website is cited in Category: AnalysisOfVariance, Category: Multiple comparisons. Excerpt: One of the commonly asked questions on listservs dealing with statistical issue is "How do I use SPSS (or whatever software is at hand) to run multiple comparisons among a set of repeated measures?" This page is a (longwinded) attempt to address that question. I will restrict myself to the case of one repeated measure (with or without a between subjects variable), but the generalization to more complex cases should be apparent. This website was last verified on 2008-01-18. URL: www.uvm.edu/~dhowell/StatPages/More_Stuff/RepMeasMultComp/RepMeasMultComp.html
  49. The Mysterious Placebo. John E. Dodes. This website is cited in Category: Placebo controlled trials. Description: Published in the January/February 1997 issue of Skeptical Inquirer. A nice overview of the placebo effect and how it influences the study of alternative medicines. This website was last verified on 2008-01-14. URL: www.csicop.org/si/9701/placebo.html

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  50. Negative Consequences of Dichotomizing Continuous Predictor Variables. Gary McClelland. This website is cited in Category: ModelingIssues. Description: This Java applet shows graphically how creating a median split for a predictor variable leads to loss of precision and power. This website was last verified on 2003-02-10. URL: psych.colorado.edu/~mcclella/MedianSplit
  51. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) for assessing the quality of nonrandomised studies in meta-analyses (GA Wells, B Shea, D O'Connell, J Peterson, V Welch, M Losos, P Tugwell). This website is cited in Category: Observational studies. Description: If you are conducting a systematic overview of nonrandomized studies, you need an objective method for evaluating the quality of these studies. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale provides a numeric score that you can use for excluding low quality studies, giving greater weight to higher quality studies, or for sensitivity analysis. This website was last verified on August 7, 2007. URL: www.ohri.ca/programs/clinical_epidemiology/oxford.htm

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  52. Overview of Computer Intensive Statistical Inference Procedures (P. Adam Kelly). This website is cited in Category: Bayesian statistics, Category: Unusual data. Description: This page provides a nice overview of the permutation test, randomization test, Monte Carlo estimation, bootstrapping, the jackknife, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. This website was last verified on 2007-08-31. www.hsrd.houston.med.va.gov/AdamKelly/resampling.html

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  53. Pediatric Drug Studies Seen as Obligation of Other Parents' Kids. Judith Groch, MedPage Today. This website is cited in Category: ChildrenInResearch. Description: This webpage summarizes the research of Davis and Matthew Davis, who surveyed parents about medical research in children. While most parents wanted to see research that insured safe medicines for children, most would not agree to let their own children participate in research studies. This website was last verified on 2008-May 23. URL: www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/GeneralPediatrics/tb/9421
  54. The Placebo Effect. Robert Todd Carroll. This website is cited in Category: Placebo controlled trials. Excerpt: The placebo effect is the measurable, observable, or felt improvement in health not attributable to treatment. This effect is believed by many people to be due to the placebo itself in some mysterious way. A placebo (Latin for “I shall please”) is a medication or treatment believed by the administrator of the treatment to be inert or innocuous. Placebos may be sugar pills or starch pills. Even “fake” surgery and “fake” psychotherapy are considered placebos. This website was last verified on 2008-01-14. URL: www.skepdic.com/placebo.html
  55. Proposal Writing Short Course (Foundation Center). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page provides a concise format for grant proposals to non-profit foundations. These components are the executive summary (1 page), statement of need (2 pages), project description (3 pages), budget (1 page), organization information (1 page), and conclusion (2 paragraphs). This website was last verified on September 4, 2007. URL: foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/shortcourse/index.html.
  56. PubCon Street Tips on Giving Presentations : Investing in our Speakers (Brett Tabke). This website is cited in Category: Scientific presentations and publications. Description: This is a folksy introduction to making a presentation. There is an emphasis on salesmanship and on computer technology, but many of the suggestions are still valuable for scientists. This website was last verified on (date). URL: www.pubcon.com/blog/index.cgi?mode=viewone&blog=1187123220

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  57. R FAQ (Kurt Hornik). This website is cited in Category: R software. Description: This page answers frequently asked questions about R. There are companion FAQ lists for Windows and Macintosh users that detail specific issues for those platforms. This website was last verified on 2007-10-08. URL: cran.r-project.org/doc/FAQ/R-FAQ.html
  58. R Manuals (R Development Core Team).  This website is cited in Category: R software. Description: This page provides PDF files introducing R, and offering explanations of various features of R. This website was last verified on 2007-10-08. URL: cran.r-project.org/manuals.html
  59. R News (Torsten Hothorn, editor). This website is cited in Category: R software. Description: This newsletter offers informal, but peer-reviewed articles about new features in R, with a special emphasis on new R packages. This website was last verified on 2007-10-08. URL: cran.r-project.org/doc/Rnews/
  60. Randomization Process in Question: Efficacy Trials Evaluating Psychotherapy vs Medications May Not Be Valid (Irving Kuo). This website is cited in Category: Exclusions in research. Description: In a study comparing various combinations of medication and/or cognitive behavioral therapy for treating depression, only 1% of all patients surveyed found all seven arms of the study acceptable. This leads to serious problems with volunteer bias. This website was last verified on 2007-12-03. URL: www.medscape.com/viewarticle/564001
  61. Reporting Non Significant Results: Summary (Diana Kornbot).  This website is cited in Category: Writing research papers. Description: Dr. Kornbrot discusses the research papers which present negative results. Adequate documentation including a power calculation and confidence interval are important. This website was last verified on 2007-11-29. URL: web.mac.com/kornbrot/iweb/KornbrotNonSignificantSummary.htm

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  62. Scientific Misconduct Blog (Aubrey Blumsohn) This website is cited in Category: Fraud in research. Description: This site provides ongoing discussion of scientific misconduct with an emphasis on pharmaceutical firms. This website was last verified on 2007-07-11. URL: scientific-misconduct.blogspot.com/
  63. Scientific Papers and Presentations (PDF). Martha Davis. This website is cited in Category: WritingResearchPapers, Category: PresentingResearchData. Excerpt: "Scientific communication is essential for helping us to use and take care of this earth. Researchers who discover the wonders of science must tell someone about their findings in clear, complete, and concise terms. To add to the pool of scientific knowledge, scientists must synthesize available information with what they discover. If a scientist garbles words or leaves out important points, messages become unclear, and the progress of science suffers." This website was last verified on 2008-03-09. URL: ecology.lifescience.ntu.edu.tw/Data_analysis/Scientific%20Papers%20and%20Presentation.pdf
  64. Specialized Proposal Development Guides (James Madison University). This website is cited in Category: Grant writing. Description: This page advocates that you place your concept in a project format ("Sponsors fund activities, not ideas"). This approach requires you to specify the problem, the objectives, the significance, the methods, the personnel, the equipment/facilities, the budget, and the evaluation. This website was last verified on 2007-09-04. URL: www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/writingtips.html.
  65. Statistical Data Analysis: Prove It with Data (Hossein Arsham). This website is cited in Category: Descriptive statistics. Description: A good general overview of statistical methods, which includes lots of statistical software examples. This website was last verified on 2007-10-09. URL: www.ubmail.ubalt.edu/~harsham/stat-data/opre330.htm
  66. Statistics Data Sets. UCLA. This website is cited in Category: TeachingResources. Description: This website provides links to data sets from books, consulting projects, and government agencies, and so forth. This website was last verified on 2002-11-26. URL: www.stat.ucla.edu/data
  67. StatLinks: Applied statistics, data analysis, and visualization. Nick Barrowman. This website is cited in Category: TeachingResources. Description: This website provides links to resources of interest to most practicing statisticians. It uses a social bookmarking system (SlinkSet), which means that any registered user can add links and can vote on links of others that they like. This website was last verified on 2008-04-15. URL: statlinks.slinkset.com
  68. Stowers Institute Bioinformatics Center and IT Group (Arcady Mushegian).  This website is cited in Category: Teaching resources. Description: This page highlights the work of the Bioinformatics Group at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. The researchers in this group provide numerous resources on new statistical programs as well as how to effectively use existing programs like R and Bioconductor. This website was last verified on 2007-10-12. URL: research.stowers-institute.org/bioinfo/

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  69. Technical Articles and Reports by David Heiser.  This website is cited in Category: Statistical computing. Description: David A. Heiser, a regular contributor to EDSTAT-L, has a nice web page at that covers some of the numerical accuracy and computational problems inherent in many statistical functions in Microsoft Excel. He also lists a series of tests that you can apply to these functions to evaluate their performance. Another section of Dr. Heiser's web page includes a list of the various measures of skewness and kurtosis. I only skimmed these resources, but they look quite good. This website was last verified on 2006-11-07. URL: www.daheiser.info
  70. The Taxonomy of Logical Fallacies (Gary N. Curtis). This website is cited in Category: Critical appraisal. Description: Understanding flaws in the process of of advocating a particular viewpoint is an important component of critical thinking. You can understand these flaws better if you can ascribe them to a particular category. This website was last verified on 2007-07-23. URL: www.fallacyfiles.org/taxonomy.html
  71. There must be something buried in here somewhere. Jerry Dallal. This website is cited in Category: MultipleComparisons. Description: This webpage uses a simulation to illustrate what happens with twenty simultaneous independent tests of significance. This website was last verified on 2008-04-10. URL: www.tufts.edu/~gdallal/multtest.htm
  72. Type I and type II errors (Wikipedia). This website is cited in Stats: What is a Type III error? (January 3, 2008). This website was last verified on 2008-01-03. Description: This entry in Wikipedia provides a simple overview of Type I and Type II errors in Statistics. It also has a nice section on various extensions to Type III and IV errors. URL: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_I_and_type_II_errors

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  73. White Paper on the Shortcomings of How Clinical Trials are Designed, Carried Out and Funded in the U.S. [PDF]. EDICT (Eliminating Disparities in Clinical Trials). This website is cited in Category: ExclusionsInResearch. Excerpt: Clinical trials are a critical resource for the discovery of new, life-saving drugs and for developing better prevention and diagnostic screening methods. Today’s most effective prevention and treatment modalities are based on previous clinical trial results. But while the need for clinical research is undisputed, how clinical trials are now conducted remains problematic. Increasing research finds major deficiencies in the way clinical trials are designed, carried out and funded in the U.S. with serious implications for the outcomes of medical research studies. Of key significance for the future of scientific innovation is the exclusion or underrepresentation of women, older people, minorities, disabled persons, and rural populations in the vast majority of the research studies conducted in the U.S. Without adequate representation of all patient populations, researchers cannot learn about potential differences among groups and cannot ensure the generalization of results. This website was last verified on 2008-04-11. URL: www.bcm.edu/edict/PDF/EDICT_Project_White_Paper.pdf

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  74. Yes, Polling Works. Frank Newport. This website is cited in Category: Survey design. Excerpt: There's little question that some Americans are skeptical of polls and the process by which we use small samples to represent the views of millions of people. We pick up that skepticism when we poll people about polls (something we do from time to time!), and I certainly hear it when I am on a radio talk show or make a speech and get bombarded with questions about the believability of our polls, which are based on what seems to the questioners to be ridiculously small numbers of people. This website was last verified on 2008-01-14. URL: www.gallup.com/poll/7174/Yes-Polling-Works.aspx

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  75. The Zoo of Loglinear Analysis. Ping Li, Department of Psychology, University of Richmond. This website is cited in Category: UnusualData. Excerpt: "Loglinear Analysis is a multivariate extension of Chi Square. You use Loglinear when you have more than two qualitative variables. Chi Square is insufficient when you have more than two qualitative variables because it only tests the independence of the variables. When you have more than two, it cannot detect the varying associations and interactions between the variables. Loglinear is a goodness-of-fit test that allows you to test all the effects (the main effects, the association effects and the interaction effects) at the same time." This website was last verified on 2008-03-12. URL: facultystaff.richmond.edu/~pli/psy538/loglin02/definition.html


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  76. 10 Big Myths about copyright explained. Brad Templeton. This website is cited in Category: WritingResearchPapers. Excerpt: Note that this is an essay about copyright myths. It assumes you know at least what copyright is -- basically the legal exclusive right of the author of a creative work to control the copying of that work. This website was last verified on 2005-04-15. URL: www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html 
  77. The 10 Commandments for Figures. Keith Head, Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia This website is cited in Category: GraphicalDisplay. Excerpt: If you need to satisfy me because I'm your prof or you think I might be a referee, then just follow the rules. If you want more information about the rationale behind the rules, they are mainly based on the books by Edward Tufte which are really worth reading for the examples and interesting discussion. This website was last verified on 2006-02-16. URL: www.pacific.commerce.ubc.ca/keith/figcoms.htm

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  78. 2-D or not 2-D? (That is the question). Garr Reynolds. This website is cited in Category: GraphicalDisplay. Excerpt: We can learn how to be better presenters by observing the masters. I often say, for example, that we can improve our presentations by emulating certain aspects of Steve Jobs' presentation style. Today, though, I'd like to talk about one aspect of Steve's presentation Tuesday that we can learn from by not emulating. And that is the use of 3-D charts to represent 2-D data. This website was last verified on 2006-02-21. URL: www.presentationzen.blogs.com/presentationzen/2006/01/2d_or_not_2d_th.html
  79. 2-way Contingency Table Analysis. John C. Pezzullo. This website is cited in Category: DescriptiveStatistics. Excerpt: This page computes various statistics from a 2-by-2 table. It will calculate a Yates-corrected chi-square, along with other quantities relevant to two special kinds of 2-by-2 tables: analysis of risk factors for unfavorable outcomes (odds ratio, relative risk, difference in proportions, number needed to treat) analysis of the effectiveness of a diagnostic criterion for some conditions (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value). This website was last verified on 2003-08-11. URL: www.members.aol.com/johnp71/ctab2x2.html

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  80. 3M APR-DRG Severity-of-Illness Software. 3M Innovation, 3M. This website is cited in Category: MeasuringBenefitRisk. Excerpt: Grouping, validating, and pricing claims data will never be the same. The State of Maryland is leading the move toward a more equitable and accurate way to pay for health care: A severity-based payment system. Supported by years of research, Maryland is acting on the fact that patients with a higher level of severity require more healthcare resources and that there are significant variances in patient severity in the existing payment system. As the State of Maryland moves toward its implementation of having hospitals set payment rates based on the 3M™ APR-DRG™ Classification System’s severity scoring, hospitals might feel overwhelmed with the requirements for change. But, this change doesn’t have to be complex. In fact, it can be easy and simple, thanks to 3M APR-DRG Severity-of-Illness Software. This website was last verified on 2008-Feb. 15. URL: http://multimedia.mmm.com/mws/mediawebserver.dyn?6666660Zjcf6lVs6EVs66SvvwCOrrrrQ-

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Broken links

  1. Question Time. [This link is broken as of 2008-01-14] The Statistical Assessment Service. Accessed on 2001-07-03. This website was cited in Category: Survey design. "Do you agree or disagree that question design is important? If it were not, then we could probably judge whom the public prefers in the presidential race by simply asking, “Who’s your pick?” But that question would get any number of answers, from the confused through the humorous to the belligerent. Instead, question formatters must follow strict rules designed to elicit the most precise answers possible." www.stats.org/newsletters/0010/question.htm
  2. Understanding Implementation. [This link is broken as of 2008-01-14] The Statistical Assessment Service. Accessed on 2000-10-16. This website was cited in Category: Survey design. A nice overview of the various types of polling and their potential problems. www.stats.org/newsletters/0010/implementation.htm

Compilations that include interesting websites

  1. Stats: Interesting stuff for the month of May (May 30, 2006)
  2. Stats: Interesting websites, publications and quotes for the month of April (updated April 12, 2006)
  3. Stats: Interesting websites, publications and quotes for the month of March (updated March 29, 2006)
  4. Stats: Interesting web sites, publications, and quotes for the month of January (January 31, 2006)
  5. Stats: Interesting websites, publications and quotes for the month of February (February 13, 2006)
  6. Stats: Interesting web sites, publications, and quotes for the month of December (December 30, 2005)
  7. Stats: Interesting web sites, publications, and quotes for the month of October (October 25, 2005)
  8. Stats: Interesting web sites, publications, and quotes for the month of September (September 9, 2005)
  9. Stats: Interesting web sites, publications, and quotes for the month of August (August 31, 2005)
  10. Stats: Interesting web links and quotes for the month of July (July 21, 2005)
  11. Stats: Interesting quotes, web pages, and publications for the month of June (June 21, 2005)
  12. Stats: Interesting web links and quotes for the month of May (May 23, 2005)
  13. Stats: Interesting web links and quotes for the month of April (April 20, 2005)
  14. Stats: Interesting web links for the month of March (March 30, 2005)
  15. Stats: Quotes for the month of March (March 10, 2005)
  16. Stats: Quotes for February (updated February 21, 2005)
  17. Stats: Recommended web links for the month of February (February 18, 2005)
  18. Stats: Quotes for the month of January (January 24, 2005)
  19. Stats: Recommended web links for the month of January (January 21, 2005)
  20. Stats: Recommended web links for the month of December (last updated December 28, 2004)

Websites that have not yet been properly formatted.

  1. Bias. Bandolier. Accessed on 2002-11-27. This website is cited in Category: TeachingResources. "Bandolier has been struck of late, 'many a time and oft', by the continuing and cavalier attitude towards bias in clinical trials. We know that the way that clinical trials are designed and conducted can influence their results. Yet people still ignore known sources of bias when making decisions about treatments at all levels." www.jr2.ox.ac.uk/bandolier/band80/b80-2.html
  2. Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Douglas Badenoch. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "Welcome to the web site of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The Centre has been established in Oxford as the first of several centres around the country whose broad aim is to promote evidence-based health care and provide support and resources to anyone who wants to make use of them." minerva.minervation.com/cebm/
  3. The Cochrane Library. The Cochrane Collaboration. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "The Cochrane Library consists of a regularly updated collection of evidence-based medicine databases, including The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - evidence-based systematic reviews prepared by the Cochrane Collaboration which provide high quality information to people providing and receiving care and those responsible for research, teaching, funding and administration at all levels." http://www.update-software.com/Cochrane/default.HTM
  4. Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. Public Health Resource Unit. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) aims to empower health and social care professionals and users of the NHS to distinguish between, and to use, good quality evidence to support decisions. The programme involves disseminating and cascading knowledge and skills in the area of evidence-based practice and endeavours to make learning in this field more accessible - ultimately improving the quality of health and social care service." http://www.phru.org.uk/~casp/index.htm
  5. Discern online. Quality criteria for consumer health information. Deborah Charnock and Sasha Shepperd. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "Despite a rapid growth in the provision of consumer health information, the quality of the information remains variable. DISCERN is a brief questionnaire which provides users with a valid and reliable way of assessing the quality of written information on treatment choices for a health problem." www.discern.org.uk/
  6. EBM Education Center of Excellence. UNC Health Sciences Library. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "This site provides a collection of resources that support teaching and learning in Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) for faculty, librarians, students, and other health care professionals." www.hsl.unc.edu/ahec/ebmcoe/pages/index.htm
  7. Finding answers to questions in evidence-based medicine (EBM). Atle Klovning. Accessed on 2002-11-27. This covers the three steps, formulate a searchable question, search, and critical appraisal. www.uib.no/isf/people/atle/ebm.htm
  8. HTA. Health Technology Assessment. Phillip Simons. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "The HTA programme is a national programme of research established and funded by the Department of Health's Research and development programme. The purpose of the programme is to ensure that high quality research information on the costs, effectiveness and broader impact of health technologies is produced in the most effective way for those who use, manage and provide care in the NHS." www.hta.nhsweb.nhs.uk/index.htm
  9. JAMA Rational Clinical Examination series bibliography. UCSF School of Medicine. Accessed on 2002-11-27. The Rational Clinical Examination series promotes 2 major goals: First, seek the identification of findings on clinical examination that are useful or useless, and the distinction must depend not on the number of advocates, but the quality of evidence. Second, stimulate new investigations into improving the clinical examination medicine.ucsf.edu/resources/guidelines/rational.html
  10. JSCAN-Online. P. Badrinath and A.G. Nicol. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "Journal Scan aims to keep you updated on the recent developments in the fields of Medicine & Health. JSCAN contains articles from journals that provide evidence for treatment, diagnosis or prognosis. These are presented in a question and answer format." jscan.uaeu.ac.ae/
  11. Randomised Controlled Trials. A user's guide.. Alejandro R Jadad. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "The randomised controlled trial (RCT) is one of the simplest, most powerful and revolutionary tools of research.1,2 In essence, the RCT is a study in which people are allocated at random to receive one of several clinical interventions." www.bmjpg.com/rct/contents.html
  12. RES&WCE - How to find the evidence. South and West Health Care Libraries Unit. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "RES&WCE (Retrieving Evidence in South and West for Clinical Effectiveness) is a training package resulting from a project commissioned by the South and West Health Care Libraries Unit and carried out by a project team based at the Information Resources section of ScHARR (School of Health and Related Research)." www.shef.ac.uk/~scharr/reswce/reswce.htm
  13. A ScHARR Introduction to evidence-based Practice on the Internet. Andrew Booth. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "Netting the Evidence is intended to facilitate evidence-based healthcare by providing support and access to helpful organisations and useful learning resources, such as an evidence-based virtual library, software and journals." www.nettingtheevidence.org.uk/
  14. Users' Guides to Evidence-Based Practice. Centre for Health Evidence. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "The following is the complete set of Users' Guides originally published as a series in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)." www.cche.net/usersguides/main.asp
  15. http://www.consort-statement.org/ "The CONSORT statement is an important research tool that takes an evidence-based approach to improve the quality of reports of randomized trials. CONSORT comprises a checklist and flow diagram to help improve the quality of reports of randomized controlled trials. It offers a standard way for researchers to report trials. The checklist includes items, based on evidence, that need to be addressed in the report; the flow diagram provides readers with a clear picture of the progress of all participants in the trial, from the time they are randomized until the end of their involvement. The intent is to make the experimental process more clear, flawed or not, so that users of the data can more appropriately evaluate its validity for their purposes."
  16. Interesting website: Occam's Razor. F. Heylighen. Accessed on 2002-10-25. One of the hallmarks of critical appraisal is the ability to search for and prefer the simplest explanation that is consistent with the data. This concept was originally voiced by a medieval philosopher, William of Occam and the principle is called Occam's razor. Here's an excerpt from this site: "One should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything. Occam's razor is a logical principle attributed to the mediaeval philosopher William of Occam (or Ockham). The principle states that one should not make more assumptions than the minimum needed." pespmc1.vub.ac.be/OCCAMRAZ.html
  17. Interesting website: Sci.skeptic FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions). Paul Johnson. Accessed on 2002-10-25. The USENET group, sci.skeptic, discusses the scientific basis for investigating unusual claims. Here is an excerpt from the Freqeuntly Asked Questions (FAQ) document for this group. "This is the sci.skeptic FAQ. It is intended to provide a factual base for most of the commonly discussed topics on sci.skeptic." home.xnet.com/~blatura/skeptic.shtml
  18. Interesting website: The Skeptic's Dictionary. Robert T. Carroll. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "Over 400 definitions and essays on occult, paranormal, supernatural, and pseudoscientific ideas and practices, and how to think critically about them." skepdic.com/
  19. http://www.weburbia.com/physics/occam.html
  20. Academic Assistance Access. Academic Assistance Access. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "Academic Assistance Access is an Internet forum system in which questions are asked to a host of professionals who, in turn, will submit an answer. The whole concept relies on a mailing list environment. If you need help with homework or assignments in any field, now or at any other time, this is the place to get it all, Free of Charge!!" www.tutoraid.org/
  21. AIDS Data Animation Project. Bob Banks, Tim Cote, Meredith Golden, Robin Lake, Henk Meij, R. P. C. Rodgers and Phil Rosenberg. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "Animations for Weekly AIDS Mortality in the United States Jan 1981 -- Dec 1992." www.ciesin.org/datasets/cdc-nci/continental.html
  22. Applied analytics and statistics for academia and industry. Stone Analytics. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "Second Moment is a dynamic meeting place for academia and industry in the fields of applied statistics and analytics. It is a platform for showcasing leading edge research and a resource for analysts and businesses interested in applying the latest statistical tools and technology. Second Moment is sponsored by Stone Analytics, a provider of analytical services, statistical models, and customized decision support applications." 2ndmoment.org/
  23. Chance News. J. Laurie Snell. Accessed on 2002-11-26. . . Accessed on November 26, 2002. "Chance News is a monthly newsletter that provides abstracts of articles from current newspapers and journals, and suggests discussion questions for class use. It also includes links to related resources at other web sites." www.dartmouth.edu/chance/chance_news/news.html
  24. Confidence Intervals. Gerard E. Dallal. Accessed on 2002-11-26. A good overview of confidence intervals with interesting examples. www.tufts.edu/~gdallal/ci.htm
  25. Dates Tutorial. Raynald Levesque. Accessed on 2001-09-07. . . Accessed September 7, 2001. This page covers several issues involving the use of dates in SPSS. pages.infinit.net/rlevesqu/LearningSyntax.htm#DateTutorial
  26. Educational Statistics Software. Jeff Rasmussen. Accessed on 2002-11-29. Educational materials in statistics, experimental design and the scientific method symynet.com/educational_software/index.htm
  27. Engineering Statistics Handbook. NIST/SEMATECH. Accessed on 2001-11-15. "The goal of this handbook is to help scientists and engineers incorporate statistical methods in their work as efficiently as possible." www.itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook
  28. Experimental WWW pages for teaching Statistics. Juha Puranen. Accessed on 2002-11-26. Some very nice interactive programs that illustrate statistical concepts. noppa5.pc.helsinki.fi/koe/index.html
  29. Exploring Data. Education Queensland. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "This website contains activities, worksheets, overhead transparency masters, datasets and assessment to support data exploration. It also contains an extensive collection of articles designed to enhance the statistics knowledge of the teacher. There is a resources page that gives a select list of the finest resources available to support introductory statistics, including texts, websites, datasets, java applets and mailing lists." exploringdata.cqu.edu.au/
  30. Fallacies. Michael C. Labossiere. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "A fallacy is, very generally, an error in reasoning. This differs from a factual error, which is simply being wrong about the facts. To be more specific, a fallacy is an "argument" in which the premises given for the conclusion do not provide the needed degree of support. A deductive fallacy is a deductive argument that is invalid (it is such that it could have all true premises and still have a false conclusion). An inductive fallacy is less formal than a deductive fallacy. They are simply "arguments" which appear to be inductive arguments, but the premises do not provided enough support for the conclusion. In such cases, even if the premises were true, the conclusion would not be more likely to be true." www1.ca.nizkor.org//features/fallacies/
  31. IASC '97 - Internet Resources for Teaching Statistics. Robin H. Lock. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "Many excellent resources for supporting statistics instruction are freely and globally available on the World Wide Web. However, finding useful information among the ever-widening sprawl of on-line sites can be a daunting task. The purpose of this paper is to help sift through the range of possibilities and highlight some of the sites which we have found to be the most helpful. We consider on-line access to electronic journals, discussion groups, statistical software, teaching aids, and course materials. Special attention is paid to using the Web as a resource for both students and teachers to find or produce interesting datasets." it.stlawu.edu/~rlock/iasc97/index.html
  32. Introduction to data collection and analysis. Albert Goodman. Accessed on 2001-07-03. "The primary aim of thus unit has been to introduce the general process of data collection as a component of the research process, with particular emphasis on those aspects of scientific research that distinguish science from other scholarly pursuits." www.deakin.edu.au/~agoodman/sci101/index.html
  33. Introduction to data collection and analysis. Albert Goodman. Accessed on 2001-07-03. "The primary aim of thus unit has been to introduce the general process of data collection as a component of the research process, with particular emphasis on those aspects of scientific research that distinguish science from other scholarly pursuits." www.deakin.edu.au/~agoodman/sci101/index.html
  34. Investigating Statistics. Robert Hale. Accessed on 2002-11-29. No description available yet. espse.ed.psu.edu/statistics/Investigating.htm
  35. Measurement theory FAQ. Warren S. Sarle. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "Measurement theory is a branch of applied mathematics that is useful in measurement and data analysis. The fundamental idea of measurement theory is that measurements are not the same as the attribute being measured. Hence, if you want to draw conclusions about the attribute, you must take into account the nature of the correspondence between the attribute and the measurements. Measurement theory was popularized in psychology by S. S. Stevens, who originated the idea of levels of measurement." ftp.sas.com/pub/neural/measurement.html
  36. Multiple significance tests and the Bonferroni correction. Martin Bland. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "This is a section from my text book An Introduction to Medical Statistics. I hope that the topic will be useful in own right, as well as giving a flavour of the book. Section references are to the book." http://www.hms.harvard.edu/orsp/coms/BiosafetyResources/Statistics/Multiple_significance_tests_and_the_Bonferroni_correction.htm
  37. Neural networks FAQ. Warren S. Sarle. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "This is the first of seven parts of a monthly posting to the Usenet newsgroup comp.ai.neural-nets (as well as comp.answers and news.answers, where it should be findable at any time). Its purpose is to provide basic information for individuals who are new to the field of neural networks or who are just beginning to read this group. It will help to avoid lengthy discussion of questions that often arise for beginners." ftp://ftp.sas.com/pub/neural/FAQ.html
  38. A New View of Statistics. Will G Hopkins. Accessed on 2001-11-15. . Accessed on November 15, 2001. "I have written these pages for researchers and students in the sport and exercise sciences. I also hope to get hits from students and researchers struggling to understand stats in other disciplines." www.sportsci.org/resource/stats/
  39. Overview of Computer Intensive Statistical Inference Procedures. P. Adam Kelly. Accessed on 2000-10-02. A nice overview of the bootstrap and other simulation methods. garnet.acns.fsu.edu/~pkelly/resampling.html
  40. PA 765 Statnotes: An Online Textbook. G. David Garson. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "PA 765 is an intermediate course in research methodology, with a focus on methodology underlying publishable journal articles in public administration. Journal articles in public administration are examined in detail, with students expected to evaluate and critique all aspects of methodology. At the same time, the course provides a consolidation of understanding of the assumptions of basic social science research methodology from multiple regression through logistic regression and structural equation modeling." www2.chass.ncsu.edu/garson/pa765/statnote.htm
  41. PSYC 5741/5751: Graduate Statistics. Charles Judd and Gary McClelland. Accessed on 2002-11-27. No description available yet. samiam.colorado.edu/~psycstat/grad_stat/welcome.html
  42. Range method for estimating standard deviation. Author Unknown. Accessed on 2000-10-02. [No description available yet.] www.uop.edu/cop/psychology/Statistics/range_method.html
  43. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Literature Research. Kelly H. Zou. Accessed on 2002-11-27. Bibliography of 306 papers on ROC curves splweb.bwh.harvard.edu:8000/pages/ppl/zou/roc.html
  44. Regressive Regression. Notesoft. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "There was a young engineering student on a mission. This lad was charged by his honored professor with discovering what seemed obvious to all; that the steeper a channel's slope, the faster the water will run. How tough could it be? His project was to discover the relationship - the equation - that related the slope of a channel to the velocity of flow." www.notesoft.com/eng_pages/stories/regressionStory/regressive_regression.htm
  45. SEM FAQ. Ed Rigdon. Accessed on 2000-10-02. A good introduction to Structural Equations Modeling (also known as path analysis, causal analysis, and LISREL models). This FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) was developed for the Internet discussion group, SEMNET. You can find out how to join SEMNET at this site. www.gsu.edu/~mkteer/semfaq.html
  46. The seven deadly statistical sins. Steven S. Ross. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "Almost everybody knows pollution is getting worse, few whites are missed in census counts, and the federal budget is in balance. Unfortunately, almost everybody is wrong. None of these things is true, at least not exactly. If that weren't bad enough, many people in power are either among the ill-informed, or have a tendency to cloak political decisions in scientific garb to make their point." www.columbia.edu/cu/21stC/issue-3.3/ross.html
  47. SMART, Explorapaedia of Statistical and Mathematical Techniques. Mike Talbot and others. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "Smart is a collaborative approach to the production and delivery of training in quantitative methods via the World Wide Web. The training is primarily focused on persons with some experience of basic statistical principles who wish to familiarise themselves with one of the newer, or more specialist techniques which they believe may be useful in their work." www.bioss.sari.ac.uk/smart/
  48. Some Remarks on Wild Observations. William H. Kruskal. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "The purpose of these remarks is to set down some non-technical thoughts on apparently wild or outlying observations. These thoughts are by no means novel, but do not seem to have been gathered in one convenient place." www.tufts.edu/~gdallal/out.htm
  49. STAR (Statistics Teaching And Resource) Library. Deborah J. Rumsey. Accessed on 2001-07-23. "[A] peer-reviewed journal of resources for introductory statistics teachers that is free of cost, readily available, and easy to customize for the use of the teacher." www.starlibrary.net
  50. Statistical Assessment Service. S. Robert Lichter, Linda S. Lichter, Iain Murray, Howard Fienberg, Matthew Felling, Christine Messina-Boyer and Erica Bell. Accessed on 2002-11-29. . Accessed on January 19, 2001. "The Statistical Assessment Service examines the way that scientific, quantitative, and social research are presented by the media, and works with journalists to help them convey this material more accurately and effectively." http://www.stats.org/ www.stats.org/
  51. Statistical Data Analysis: Prove It with Data. Hossein Arsham. Accessed on 2000-06-28. A good general overview of statistical methods, which includes lots of statistical software examples. ubmail.ubalt.edu/~harsham/stat-data/opre330.htm
  52. Statistical methods for assessing agreement between two methods of clinical measurement. J. Martin Bland and Douglas G. Altman. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "In clinical measurement comparison of a new measurement technique with an established one is often needed to see whether they agree sufficiently for the new to replace the old. Such investigations are often analysed inappropriately, notably by using correlation coefficients. The use of correlation is misleading. An alternative approach, based on graphical techniques and simple calculations, is described, together with the relation between this analysis and the assessment of repeatability." www.mbland.sghms.ac.uk/ba.htm
  53. Statistical power analysis software. Len Thomas and Charles J. Krebs. Accessed on 2002-11-26. A review article originally published in the Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America 78 (2): 126-139. April 1997. www.zoology.ubc.ca/~krebs/power.html
  54. Statistical Rules of Thumb. Gerald Van Belle. Accessed on 2002-11-26. Material from the book of the same name. www.vanbelle.org/
  55. Statistics and research methods. Canadian Medical Association Journal. Accessed on 2002-11-27. Articles published in CMAJ www.cmaj.ca/cgi/collection/statistics_and_research_methods
  56. Statistics at Square On. TDV Swinscow and MJ Campbell. Accessed on 2001-11-15. This page is sponsored by the British Medical Journal and has papers on descriptive statistics, probability, t tests, regression, and survival analysis. www.bmj.com/collections/statsbk/index.shtml
  57. Sums of Squares In Unbalanced Analysis of Variance. Donald Macnaughton. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "Three fundamental concepts of science and statistics are entities, variables (which are formal representations of properties of entities), and relationships between variables. These concepts help to distinguish between two uses of the statistical tests in analysis of variance (ANOVA)." www.matstat.com/ss/
  58. SurfStat Australia. Annette Dobson, Anne Young, Bob Gibberd and others. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "The SurfStat project started in 1994 with the brave but naive intent of making an existing set of course notes available online as hypertext. It has since grown to include an extensive glossary, interactive exercises, JavaScript functions replacing statistical probability tables, and the beginnings of a set of Java applets demonstrating statistical concepts through dynamic graphics. It is the primary learning resource for students taking STAT101 at the University of Newcastle, Australia." www.anu.edu.au/nceph/surfstat/surfstat-home/surfstat.html
  59. There must be something buried in here somewhere. Jerry Dallal. Accessed on 2001-02-09. A simple illustration of twenty simultaneous independent tests of significance. www.tufts.edu/~gdallal/multtest.htm
  60. Vassar Stats. R Lowry. Accessed on 2001-11-15. "Welcome to «Concepts and Applications of Inferential Statistics», which is a free, full-length, and occasionally interactive statistics textbook." faculty.vassar.edu/~lowry/webtext.html
  61. WISE: Web Interface for Statistics Education. Dale Berger. Accessed on 2001-07-03. "The Claremont Colleges' "Web Interface for Statistics Education" seeks to expand teaching resources offered through Introductory Statistics courses, especially in the social sciences. This project aims to develop an on-line teaching tool to take advantage of the unique hypertextual and presentational benefits of the World Wide Web (WWW). This teaching tool's primary application is as a supplement to traditional teaching materials, addressing specific topics that instructors have difficulty in presenting using traditional classroom technologies. The tool serves to promote self-paced learning and to provide a means for advanced students to review concepts." acad.cgu.edu/wise/
  62. World Lecture Hall. Center for Instructional Technologies. Accessed on 2002-11-29. Web-based lectures on many academic topics including Statistics. www.utexas.edu/world/lecture/
  63. Teaching resources, Data sets for analysis
  64. Chance. Snell JL, Doyle P, Garfield J, Moore T, Peterson B, Shah N. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "Welcome to Chance! This site contains materials to help teach a Chance course. Chance is a quantitative literacy course developed cooperatively by the Chance Team: J. Laurie Snell and Peter Doyle of Dartmouth College, Joan Garfield of the University of Minnesota, Tom Moore of Grinnell College, Bill Peterson of Middlebury College, and Ngambal Shah of Spelman College. We were assisted by grants from NECUSE and the National Science Foundation's Undergraduate Curriculum Development Program. The goal of Chance is to make students more informed, critical readers of current news stories that use probability and statistics." www.dartmouth.edu/~chance/
  65. The Data and Story Library (DASL). Cornell University. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "DASL (pronounced "dazzle") is an online library of datafiles and stories that illustrate the use of basic statistics methods. We hope to provide data from a wide variety of topics so that statistics teachers can find real-world examples that will be interesting to their students. Use DASL's powerful search engine to locate the story or datafile of interest." lib.stat.cmu.edu/DASL/
  66. Datasets. Pew Research Center. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "Welcome to the Pew Research Center For The People & The Press data archive. This page contains links to the Center's survey data which are currently available on the web. Survey data are released six months after the reports are issued and are posted on the web as quickly as possible." people-press.org/dataarchive/
  67. Dr. B's Wide World of Web Data. Behrens J. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "This archive is a set of links to data and depictions of data from throughout the world. It is organized by topic areas. We hope instructors will use these data for examples in classes AND set students loose to find data that THEY find interesting." research.ed.asu.edu/msms/multimedia/DrB/Default.htm
  68. Exploring Data. Boggs R. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "This website contains activities, worksheets, overhead transparency masters, datasets and assessment to support data exploration. It also contains an extensive collection of articles designed to enhance the statistics knowledge of the teacher. There is a resources page that gives a select list of the finest resources available to support introductory statistics, including texts, websites, datasets, java applets and mailing lists." exploringdata.cqu.edu.au
  69. Introduction to Statistics, Second Semester, List of Data and Stories. Rolke WA. Accessed on 2002-11-29. "Abstract not available yet." "The following is a list of the data sets I used in the second semester of our Introductory Statistics course ESMA 3102 with a short explanation of the data and the purpose of the data. This is the second half of a one-year sequence where we discuss regression, categorical data analysis and ANOVA." math.upr.clu.edu/~wrolke/esma3102/3102.htm
  70. Journal of Statistics Education (JSE) Data Archive. American Statistical Association. Accessed on 2002-11-27. Data sets used in the various articles in the Journal of Statistics Education. www.amstat.org/publications/jse/archive.htm
  71. OzDASL - Australasian Data and Story Library. Smyth G. Accessed on 2000-12-26. "OzDASL is a library of data sets and associated stories. It is intended as a resource for teachers of statistics in Australia and New Zealand, and emphasis is given to data sets with an Australasian context." www.statsci.org/data/
  72. Statistical Reference Datasets: Archives. National Institute for Standards and Technology. Accessed on 2000-11-26. "The purpose of this project is to improve the accuracy of statistical software by providing reference datasets with certified computational results that enable the objective evaluation of statistical software." www.nist.gov/itl/div898/strd/general/dataarchive.html
  73. Statistics Case Studies. Draper D, Michailides G. Accessed on 2002-11-26. "This is a long and continually growing list of HTML based case-studies. Many of them are based on a previous LaTeX based version prepared by David Draper and George Michailides. Others are based on consulting jobs, and quite a few are taken from the literature." www.stat.ucla.edu/cases
  74. Statistics Data Sets. UCLA. Accessed on 2002-11-26. Links to data sets from books, consulting projects, and government agencies, and so forth. www.stat.ucla.edu/data
  75. Statlib. Carnegie Mellon University. Accessed on 2002-09-24. "Welcome to StatLib, a system for distributing statistical software, datasets, and information by electronic mail, FTP and WWW." lib.stat.cmu.edu/
  76. Jokes about Statistics http://www.xs4all.nl/~jcdverha/scijokes/1_2.html
  77. Gary Ramseyer's First Internet Gallery of Sta.
  78. Science Jokes1. MATHEMATICS 1.2 STATISTICS.
  79. Science Jokes6. THE MATHEMATICIAN, THE PHYSI.
  80. http://www.maths.lth.se/matstat/datalib/multi.txt
  81. Catalog of Electronic Resources. University of Puerto Rico. Accessed on 2003-05-30. This site covers the following categories: Reference Information, Health Information, Journals, Statistics, Software, Puerto Rico, International Organizations, USA Organizations. www.rcm.upr.edu/PublicHealth/bio-epi/BE_internet.htm
  82. St@tServ Home Page. Thiery Fahmy, Vincent Fortin, Walter Van Hecke. Accessed on 2002-11-27. "Welcome on St@tServ, the central information server for Statistics & Data Mining on the Internet." This link was broken when I tested it on 2003-05-30. www.statserv.com/
  83. Statistical Science Web. Gordon Smyth. Accessed on 2003-05-30. "The Statistical Science Web (StatWeb) is designed to provide an all-in-one guide to statistical science resources, with special attention to Australian resources. At the time of writing, I believe that it is the most active site in Australia devoted to statistical science." This site covers the following categories: Associations, Statistical Computing, Units, General Computing, Keeping in touch, Publications, Teaching, Reference, Research, Planning that trip, Jobs, If it's not here ... www.statsci.org/
  84. Statistics and Statistical Graphics Resources. Michael Friendly. Accessed on 2003-05-30. "This page provides an annotated, topic-based collection of available resources for statistics, statistical graphics, and computation related to research, data analysis and teaching, now containing over 580 links." This site covers the following categories: General statistical resources, York stuff, Statistical Associations, Statistics Departments, SAS stuff, SPSS, LispStat, S Plus and R, Minitab, Mathematica, Data Visualization & Statistical Graphics, Psychology & Psychometrics, Online courses, Online WWW statistics, Data, Categorical Data Analysis, Other Statistical Packages, Unix, APL & J. www.math.yorku.ca/SCS/StatResource.html
  85. Statistics on the Web. Clay Helberg. Accessed on 2003-05-30. "This is a list of statistics resources I have discovered on the World Wide Web (WWW). I hope you will find them useful. If you know of (or maintain) a statistics resource on the Web that you don't see here, please drop me a line to let me know about it, and I'll take a look at it. Enjoy! Note: this site, and my expertise, have to do with statistical methods. You won't find any information here about: Which web sites are most popular, Demographic profiles of computer owners or net surfers, How many web pages there are, Or other related questions." This site covers the following categories: Professional Organizations, Institutes and Consulting Groups, Educational Resources, Publications and Publishers, Statistics Book List, Software-oriented Pages, Mailing Lists and Discussion Groups, Other lists of links, Statisticians and Other Statistical People. my.execpc.com/~helberg/statistics.html
  86. Statistics Resources. Adrienne Goldsmith. Accessed on 2003-11-25. "Welcome! The Qozi.com team maintains a complex directory of web links and resources. We are dedicated to maintaining and enhancing the directory, with your help. Visitors are invited to add their links, if the links are compatible with the theme of our directory. Best wishes." www.n-e-x-u-s.com/statistics/
  87. Statistics servers and other links.. Institute of Statistics and Decision Sciences. Accessed on 2003-05-30. No description available yet. www.isds.duke.edu/stats-sites.html
  88. The World of Statistics. Mike Fuller. Accessed on 2003-05-30. "This site is being developed by Mike Fuller to provide a gateway to the world of statistics and related subjects including teaching and learning about these areas." www.statistics.fsnet.co.uk/
  89. The World Wide Web Virtual Library: Statistics. Mike Conlon. Accessed on 2003-05-30. This site covers the following categories: Data Sources, Job Announcements, Departments, Divisions, and Schools of Statistics, On-Line Educational Resources, Government Statistical Institutes, Statistical Research Groups, Institutes, and Associations, Statistical Services, Statistical Archives and Resources, Statistical Software Vendors and Software FAQs, Statistical Journals, Mailing Lists and Archives, Statistics Related News Groups, Related Fields. www.stat.ufl.edu/vlib/statistics.html
  90. Overheated claims http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fpcomment/archive/2008/06/17/overheated-claims.aspx Category: Human side of statistics
  91. Science danger ahead: Baby bottles, BPA and the precautionary principle http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fpcomment/archive/2008/06/19/too-cautious.aspx Category: Human side of statistics
  92. Good science http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fpcomment/archive/2008/06/18/good-science.aspx Category: Conflict of interest
  93. http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/336/7658/1402 Key opinion leaders: independent experts or drug representatives in disguise? BMJ 2008;336:1402-1403 (21 June), doi:10.1136/bmj.39575.675787.651 Category: Conflict of interest

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Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. This page was written by Steve Simon and was last modified on 2010-04-11.